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Requeening a savage colony of bees
One good reason to replace an existing bee queen is when the colony shows consistant aggressive behaviour.

By replacing the queen you can change the genetic characteristics of the entire colony.

Requeening a savage colony can become very discomforting and despite the bee suit you will have to be prepared to suffer a few stings during this exercise.

With a bit of planning and preparation the pain can be minimised.

Preparation is key
A bit of planning and preparation can minimise the pain. This method assumes that a spare and empty hive is available into which the colony is being transferred; this minimises the time of exposure to the savage colony of bees. It is also assumed that the replacement queen in her cage is available and can be inserted into the hive.

Step by step instructions for requeening a savage colony of honeybees
Please familiarise yourself with the concept of this step-by-step process to shorten the time of interaction with aggressive bees.
Search thoroughly each frame until the old queen is found. If the queen is not found you need to repeat the whole exercise!

Note: Aggressive bees or not, this process is applicable to all bee queen replacements.

Activities at original hive location
Comments
Activities at temporary hive location
Comments
1. Use your smoker as an induction, as usual.
tba
2. Move the savage hive away to a temporary location; do not open it yet.
Temporary location to be about five meters away and not in the flight path of its original location.
3. Place the empty hive at the original location of the savage hive and remove the lid and super if present.
Ready to be filled with frames.
tba
4. Foraging bees from the savage hive, returning from their flight, will start entering the empty hive.
These are the ones likely to sting.
tba
tba
5. Open the savage hive and place the super, if present, to the side onto the upside-down lid. Ready to start working on the brood box first.
tba
6. Remove a frame out of the brood box and search on it for the queen; if necessary shake some bees off. When the queen is found, squash her. Without the queen on the frame, transfer the frame to the empty hive.
7. Be certain the queen is not on the frame and insert the frame into the empty hive, in the same position and orientation it was in the original hive.
Repeat steps 6 and 7 for only two frames out of the brood box. If queen already found, transfer all remaining frames from original hive into empty hive and continue at step 15.
tba
8. Wait 30 minutes and let most field bees from the hive fly to original hive location (into the empty hive).
9. Remove the next frame out of the brood box and search on it for the queen; if necessary shake some bees off. When the queen is found, squash her. Without the queen on the frame, transfer the frame to the empty hive.
tba
10. Be certain that the queen is not on the frame and insert the frame into the empty hive, in the same position and orientation it was in the original hive.
Repeat steps 9 and 10 until all frames out of brood box have been processed or the queen has been found. When the queen has been found, transfer all remaining frames from original hive into empty hive and continue at step 15.
11. When all frames from the brood box have been transferred, stack empty super on.
tba
tba
12. Remove the next frame out of the super and search on it for the queen; if necessary shake some bees off. When the queen is found, squash her. Without the queen on the frame, transfer the frame to the empty hive.
13. Be certain that the queen is not on the frame and insert the frame into the super, in the same position and orientation it was in the original hive.
Repeat steps 12 and 13 until all frames out of the super have been processed. When the queen has been found, transfer all remaining frames from original hive into empty hive and continue at step 15.
tba
14. If the queen has not been found on the frames, examine remaining bees in broodbox and super/lid - find the queen and sqash her.
If the queen could not be found, start the process again.
15. With the old queen found and destroyed, insert the new queen in her cage into the hive and close the hive.
tba
16. Bring original broodbox, super and lid from temporary location to original location to shake out remaining bees in front of new hive.
tba
17. Shake off all remaining bees from original brood box, super and lid in front of hive to let them crawl in.
tba
18. Wait one week before opening the hive again for inspection. Check for new eggs being layed as proof that new queen has been accepted.
If no eggs found, but queen cells instead, the new queen has not been accepted and the colony is raising a queen of their own.
Remove queen cells and requeen again.
tba
last update 20-Jun-2017
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